Slides and links(below) from my “What’s NNNNNNNNew in Android Security” talk at Droidcon London. The video via SkillsMatter is here.

Resources:

Training and Developer Docs

Would you like me to speak at your conference or meetup? If so please get in contact.

Any questions, please drop me an email or tweet.

 

Droidcon London is one of my favourite conferences with it’s wall to wall Android theme. I’ve spoken 3 times over the past 6 years or so and I’m super excited to be speaking this year after a break of a couple of years. I tend to speak about Android Security because it’s an area of app development that isn’t often prioritised high enough. Mobile security comes with it’s own set of challenges where devices and data are physically at more risk than traditional PC/Laptop environment.

In addition to checking out the other security talks I’m keen to learn tips and quick wins for view animations and screen transitions. Also top of my list is learning from real world experiences and lessons learnt using different architectural approaches such as MVP and Clean architecture. I’m looking forward to getting to grips with Kotlin based on the news that Kotlin is supported for build scripts in Gradle 3.0. 

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My Talk – What’s NNNNNNew in Android Security?

As you might guess from the name is all about the new security features in the most recent versions of Android: Nougat aka N.

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Who should come to it?

There were several notable security updates in Android Nougat and in this talk I’ve distilled the information specially for the busy developer who don’t have a lot of time to invest in learning new APIs. I’m personally most excited about Android 7’s Network security config. It’s an easy way to increase your app’s network security without writing any code (just xml based config). I’ll show you the most likely things you’d use it for with code samples. For example allowing self signed certificates for development API and SSL pinning.

See you there!

Also watch @scottyab and speakerdeck profile for the slides 

Thanks to Matt Rollings, Niall Scott and Andy Barber proofreading feedback.

Scott MCEI had a great time at MCE conference in Warsaw, Poland in April. I’d recommend MCE as a mobile conference I attended both Android and iOS talks and there were all high quality. Also all the people I met were very friendly and spoke great english. I was introduced to Polish vodka and some tasty polish food. Thanks to the organisers for inviting me and I hope to attend again.

In this presentation I share a story of a recent Android app I developed where app security wasn’t prioritised and how I still provided a minimal level of security to protect the app’s users and developer reputation.

For those wondering why my t-shirt has a mantis shrimp on it? check out this awesome oatmeal comic.

Last week I attended the first Blackhat mobile security summit in London. It was a great chance for us to learn from security specialists.

I co-wrote this article to highlights some of our favourite and key takeaways.

  • New Android Security Rewards Program
  • State of malware on Android/mobile
  • Samsung / SwiftKey Zip Traversal Hack
  • SSL validation (or lack of) still one of most common app vulns
  • “erase everything” = not everything?
  • Windows phone 8 exploits and security faux pas

gotocope_smI have been fortunate enough to be invited to speak at goto; conference in Copenhagen on October 6th. I’ll be giving a talk I one of my favourite subjects: Android app security. If you can make it please come and say hi.

 

Abstract:

Global mobile adoption is spreading like wildfire, pervasive government surveillance programs are coming to light and major internet security exploits are being uncovered. This results in increased awareness from users, managers and developers for the dire need for rigorous security in deployed code. While mobile device security can be helped via mobile device management (MDM) solutions it’s our responsibility as app developers/publishers to ensure our apps protect user privacy and critical business data. The problem is securing your Android app and data is not always obvious or well documented.

This talk will cover current Android app threats and look at how with freely available tools we can easily reverse engineer an Android app. After a brief introduction to Android platform security and how to protected app components, we’ll cover enhanced SSL validation, encryption, tamper protection and advanced obfuscation techniques. We will also focus on leveraging open source commercially viable libraries allowing us to increase our app’s security with minimal effort.

These best practise techniques will arm you with practical solutions that can help you survive in the Android security jungle.

I have released a new open source library to wrap a Google Play services API called SafetyNet, which has been completely eclipsed by the recent Google IO and WWDC coverage 😉 safetynet_framed

Here’s a blog post that explains a bit about what is it and why and here’s the code on github.

I’ve also released the Sample app on the Google Play store so you can run the Safety Net test on your own device.

 

Another blog on the Intohand blog, this time “How to publish your open source library to Maven central”

Have you created a great (or at least useful) Java/Android open source project that you want to enable other developers usmavene in their projects easily? have you wondered how to publish your library to Maven central? then this is the article for you!

http://intohand.com/blog/post/how-to-publish-your-open-source-library-to-maven-central

This is an extract for a blog post I wrote for intohand. Read the full article here.

Whilst emulators provide a function, nothing beats testing on real hardware. As a developer however unless you’re near a test wall of phones, have a very large bag or lots of colleagues/friends who are all running different software versions it can be a pain. It would be ideal if you could have a single phone that acted as a Swiss Army knife.

At the end of this article using a tool called MultiRom you’ll have a Nexus 4 with the option of booting into various versions of Android.

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